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Doing Kindness For Nothing in Return

Guest Post: Rebecka Vigus



I learned all the obvious about Santa growing up. I am the eldest of four children; my youngest sister is eight years younger than me. My parents told us when I was about twelve that if we didn’t believe in Santa to speak up because Santa only delivers to children who believe. None of us claimed to not believe in Santa. The motive behind this was to keep my youngest sister believing.


Fast forward to when I became a mother. I wanted my daughter to know you can do kind things for people and get nothing in return. We adopted a family at Christmas one year and bought for them. Then another year, we adopted a senior citizen. We learned from the local senior center who could use help and the types of things, including the food they might need. We packed a basket of food and some extra items we thought she would enjoy and delivered them to her.


The result was my daughter acquired another grandparent for a year. We surprised her with an Easter basket. B the summer's end, her daughter would come and move her in with her family. It was sad to see her go, but we knew she wanted to be near her grandchildren.


Why this Book?



When I was thinking of a middle grades Christmas book, I wrote it with two characters from a flash fiction piece I’d written for an anthology, Teddy Brinker and Tommy Huff. The boys were best friends and aged twelve. One believed in the power of Santa, and one believed Santa was your parents.

Throughout the book, the two boys and their dads built a wheelchair ramp so a student in their school could come home for Christmas. Their moms got into the act by preparing food for the family and taking their children to shop for gifts.

The entire project pulled in neighbors and friends of the family, and all were there when the young man came home. Even the local press. This is when Teddy, who had reluctantly agreed, made the connection.

I believe it’s great for children to read for enjoyment. It’s even better when they can take something away from it.


Giving Children the Opportunity to Read


Whenever you give a child a book, it’s an opportunity for them to read. Many children today don’t read for pleasure. It’s something we need to be concerned about. Giving them a book with a lesson might get them reading.

Best friends Teddy Brinker and Tommy Huff are at it again. Tommy wants to convince Teddy that Santa is real even if he doesn’t always wear a red suit. He sets out to find a way to convince Teddy. Teddy goes along, knowing he will win this one.

The boys build a wheelchair ramp for a student in their school so he can come home for Christmas. Both boys learn a big lesson when Brady makes it home on Christmas Eve. Best friends Teddy Brinker and Tommy Huff are at it again. Tommy wants to convince Teddy that Santa is real even if he doesn’t always wear a red suit. He sets out to find a way to convince Teddy. Teddy goes along, knowing he will win this one.

The boys build a wheelchair ramp for a student in their school so he can come home for Christmas. Both boys learn a big lesson when Brady makes it home on Christmas Eve.

Get the conversation started with this book.



Rebecka Vigus is the author of 15 books. Santa Is for Real is the first for middle grades, and she is working on another. Teddy and Tommy will be featured in a book in 2024.

She is a former teacher, an author, a speaker, and a writing coach. She lives in the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains of Kentucky and drinks her tea on her back deck, watching the sunrise. She also crochets and gifts many of her former students with baby layettes. https://www.rebeckavigus.com is where you will find her books.

Catch her on 2/21/23 on the BEACON OF LIGHT PODCAST at 6:30 pm Mountain time here:



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